Microsoft Launches New Email Service: Outlook.com

Microsoft today launched a new service email free but with an old and well – known brand. Called Outlook.com, the service is basically a Hotmail successor redesigned, focusing mainly on the metro interface – something that Microsoft does not tire to implement in all its products. For those who do not remember, this service leaked a few weeks ago and at the time was called NewMail.

When you log in the new service, which can be integrated with an existing Microsoft account, the user will be presented to a panel with the display messages and a sidebar. At the top right, there is a field of options that allows you to enable the reading pane, which displays the text of a message to the right or below when selected. You can also change the color scheme in this bar.

The new message panel is simple and offers editing tools that are used to seeing in other services – including to insert emoticons. But he follows the initial panel interface with two columns – a smaller, left, to enter the message recipients, and another larger one on the right to enter the message itself. It’s a different interface than the others have, and although it is not necessarily good or bad, I liked to see a clear separation in both fields.

The idea of Outlook.com is to serve as centralized messaging and social networks, as it has native integration with Twitter and Facebook. In addition there are in the Microsoft plans to integrate the service with Skype to make video conferencing possible direct the browser – something that Google already does with Gmail for some time. Other similarities with Gmail are on display the number of unread messages in the page title and the grouping messages by subject.

These and other features of Outlook.com were demonstrated in the official video posted on Microsoft’s YouTube channel.
(Video on YouTube)

There are still several flaws. The translation into Portuguese was poorly positioned and cut some words and the registration form does not yet support the 9 digit mobile numbers in São Paulo. That said, there are also a lot of confusion about the service: despite using Outlook.com as a trademark, the address to which the user is redirected to use the service is Live.com and stirring the settings until I got to be redirected to a page with hotmail.com. Hi?

As a whole, I do not think it is bad. And offer an alternative to free email service for internet users is not a bad attitude. Because users will see this offer is, in the end, that makes all the difference. So say what, what do you think?